Solutions overview

Our freely accessible climate solutions cover the most carbon-intensive operational activities, sources of environmental degradation, as well as organisational matters. Each solution area comprises multiple detailed solutions, providing organisations with different points of entry to encourage direct action. We regularly share new solutions – stay tuned by subscribing to the newsletter.

Transport

Global transportation is responsible for 24% of direct CO2 emissions from fuel combustion.(1) Road vehicles are responsible for almost ¾ of CO2 emissions from transport. Emissions from shipping and aviation continue to rise at an alarming rate; aviation being the most carbon-intensive mode of transport. The aid sector relies heavily on transport for delivering its missions, whether it be commuting, staff travel or freight transport. However, by adopting bold measures based mainly on sobriety, modal shift, optimisation, mutualisation and alternative fuels, emissions can be greatly reduced without affecting the organisations’ mission.

Discover all solutions here.

 

Procurement

In the aid sector, emissions from the procurement of goods and services make up about 40 – 70% of an organisation’s carbon footprint. These emissions stem both from the procurement of goods & services for the organisation itself, as well as from the distribution of food, non-food, or medical items to beneficiaries. The latter usually makes up by far the largest share. Organisations can improve demand planning in order to avoid air shipment and surplus items, identify low-carbon alternatives, establish environmental procurement criteria and engage with suppliers to decarbonise. In addition, making structural changes to operations or ways of working can reduce the need for certain items or services. Specific solutions for certain key items, such as food, non-food, medical items, or packaging exist.

Discover all solutions here.

Energy and buildings

The building sector, including construction and operation, accounted for 36% of global energy consumption and 37% of CO2 emissions in 2019. (2) Electricity consumption in building operations represents nearly 55% of global electricity consumption. The buildings sector emission increase is due to a continued use of coal, oil and natural gas for heating and cooking combined with higher activity levels in regions where electricity remains carbon intensive. Energy transition relies on reducing energy consumption, (thanks to energy sobriety and efficiency), sustainable construction and renovation (including passive measures), and the use of renewable energy.

Discover all solutions here.

Digital

The impact of digital technologies on climate and the environment has increased in recent years. However, they are often underestimated and represent a risk if not properly considered in climate roadmaps. The energy intensity of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector is growing by 4% per year. (3) 45% of the greenhouse gases generated by digital activities are related to the manufacture of IT equipment. Yet, digital technologies became critical for reducing emissions from business travel. By rationalising practices and the amount of digital equipment, it is possible to limit the growth in the climate impact of digital within organisations.

Discover all solutions here.

Waste

Waste is the fourth largest source sector of global emissions, accounting for 3.3% of total greenhouse gas emissions in 2018. (4) It also has a major impact on our environment because of the pollution it generates in water, air or land. Sustainable waste management is based on a life-cycle approach: from avoidance, reduction, reuse, repair and finally recycling, treatment and disposal. It is often necessary to develop actions by type of waste because not all waste has the same specificity (food, general, electronic, garage, hazardous, medical).

Discover all solutions here.

  • Waste management

  • Electronic waste

  • Food waste

    Coming soon

  • Garage waste

    Coming soon

  • General waste

    Coming soon

  • Medical waste

    Coming soon

  • Hazardous waste

    Coming soon

Water

Water systems are a major source of greenhouse gas emissions: water utilities worldwide emit the same volume of greenhouse gas as the global shipping industry. (5) Half of the world’s population could be living in areas facing water scarcity by as early as 2025. (6) Water pollution has risen across three continents, placing hundreds of millions of people at risk of contracting life-threatening diseases like cholera and typhoid. (7) However, solutions exist to better preserve water resources, both in quantity and quality, and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, often at low cost.

Discover all solutions here.

  • Water preservation

    Coming soon

  • Sanitation

    Coming soon

Ecosystems

Nature is critical to human survival. Yet, it is under increasing stress. Deforestation and desertification – caused by human activities and climate change – affect the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Around 1 million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction. The health of our planet also plays an important role in the emergence of zoonotic diseases. (8) Forests, peatlands, wetlands, ocean and coastal ecosystems represent globally significant carbon stores. Their protection and restoration offer cost-effective and proven ways to mitigate climate change. Such ecosystems can also serve as natural buffers against climate extremes and other disasters and strengthen adaptation to climate change. (9) Organisations can support or implement nature conservation initiatives, adopt good land management and nature-friendly practices and help reduce pollution.

Discover all solutions here.

  • Nature-friendly practices

  • Raising awareness

    Coming soon

  • Bring back nature

    Coming soon

Transversal

There are important cross-cutting practices that organisations and professionals can adopt to reduce and limit their carbon footprint and that of others in the short and long term. This includes, but is not limited to, green office practices, choice of banks and how to use pension or investment funds. It is a way of engaging and encouraging sustainability, being consistent across its activities, improving an organisation’s image, inspiring its network and strengthening climate action.

Discover all solutions here.

Service delivery models

When reducing an organisation’s carbon footprint, it is necessary to review the way services are delivered. This means that the operational model of the organisation – at all stages of the process and structure – must be considered as an opportunity to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and taken into account in a climate strategy. Solutions include optimising resources, avoiding duplication and opting for a more sustainable equipment lifecycle. For example, in the case of the health sector, solutions may consist of rethinking the quantity or the way medicines are prescribed, centralising/decentralising hospitals or introducing teleconsultations.

Discover all solutions here.

Strategy and implementation

To decarbonise an organisation, it is essential to have an integrated strategy and implementation that ensures emission reductions in a cross-cutting and long-term manner. Such a strategy will allow moving from discourse to action, from conceptual to operational, at different levels.

Key steps include:

1) a clear commitment to change from decision-makers;

2) mobilisation of the necessary means and capacities (environmental focal point, budgetary resources, expertise);

3) definition of clear and achievable orientations and objectives;

4) development of a roadmap (identification of solutions, scenarios, feasibility assessments);

5) a concrete and precise multi-year action plan (with indicators);

6) empowerment of the organisation’s staff at all levels (leaders, directors, managers, employees, consultants) by integrating the climate objectives into their job descriptions (allowing for accountability);

7) monitoring and control of the implementation.

Discover all solutions here.

 

 

Cover photo © Andres Siimon/Unsplash.

Construction and renovation
solution area

Construction and renovation

Waste from electrical and electronic equipment
solution area

Waste from electrical and electronic equipment

Water
solution area

Water

Waste
solution area

Waste

Transversal
solution area

Transversal

Transport
solution area

Transport

Procurement
solution area

Procurement

Energy and buildings
solution area

Energy and buildings

Ecosystems
solution area

Ecosystems

Digital
solution area

Digital

Business travel
solution area

Business travel

Commuting
solution area

Commuting

Digital uses
solution area

Digital uses

Energy consumption of buildings
solution area

Energy consumption of buildings

Freight
solution area

Freight

Green office – Individual level
solution area

Green office – Individual level

Green office – Organisational level
solution area

Green office – Organisational level

Investments and pension funds
solution area

Investments and pension funds

Nature-friendly practices
solution area

Nature-friendly practices

Packaging
solution area

Packaging

Supplier engagement
solution area

Supplier engagement

Renewable energy
solution area

Renewable energy

Banks
solution area

Banks

Waste management: principles and life cycle
solution area

Waste management: principles and life cycle

Procurement criteria
solution area

Procurement criteria

Food items
solution area

Food items

Non-food items
solution area

Non-food items